Intro: FBI’s Art Theft Program

After the looting of the Baghdad Museum, the U.S. government knew they needed a team of investigators dedicated to art crime. This included both stolen art and looted art from archeological dig sites. In 2004, The FBI established the ART THEFT PROGRAM specializing in these types of crimes.
The Art Theft Team established an online log of stolen items called the National Stolen Art File or NSAF to publicize the missing pieces in hopes of keeping the items from re-entering the marketplace secretly.
The Art Loss Register was created in the UK, and is the world’s largest database for stolen art. It can be found at http://www.artloss.com/en

It is estimated that art crime is a $4 to $6 Billion yearly industry. These estimates are hard to prove since many art crimes are not reported. The FBI has established its Top 10 Most Wanted list of Art Crimes to showcase the stolen items in hopes of increasing their chances of recovery.

Below is a short video from the FBI’s website explaining the FBI’s ART Team

 

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synovacantrell

Synova Cantrell is a true crime writer, fiction writer, and children’s book author. As a freelance journalist, her works could be seen online at ehow.com, livestrong.com/lifestyle, hubpages.com, and amykitchenerfdn.org and in five regional publications. Deeply concerned with illiteracy in America’s youth, Synova took her children’s book The Sleepy Little Sun and spoke in schools state-wide about the importance of reading. As a motivational speaker, Synova has encouraged fellow writers at local conferences, presided over a local writers’ guild, and spoke at writing workshops. For more information of her many projects log on to www.synovaink.com

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