New Father Gunned Down in Cold Blood – The Unsolved Murder of Danny King

danny king - crime stoppers flyer

He was a 20-yr-old newlywed with a three-day-old baby. Daniel W. King was also the son-in-law of a prominent local judge in St. Louis County, MO. He was working as an apprentice pipe fitter at Honeywell, Inc., and life seemed to be starting off on the right foot, unfortunately, this would come to a screeching halt on June 18, 1982.

Danny went to the local hospital to have dinner with his wife and new baby before heading out to his weekly softball game with the Pipe fitters Local 562. At the game, the ecstatic new father handed out pink cigars to all his teammates. After the game, a few of the guys went to a local bar to celebrate. Danny drove two of his teammates home around 2 am and was heading to his home in Florissant, MO.

For some unknown reason, Danny pulled his 1976 Ford Futura to the side of the road. It is unclear if a vehicle was already parked there, or if one pulled over in front of him. Whatever the case, a shooter exited the other car and begins shooting Danny King through the passenger side window. Tire tracks show that the wounded man threw his car into reverse and tore up the road backward. The car careened up the grassy embankment before crashing back down across the road only coming to a stop when the car hits the concrete median.

The autopsy showed three of the five shots hit King in the side and arm. No one knows who would have wanted the young man dead. He had no known enemies. Police quickly ruled out robbery since his wallet was undisturbed. While everyone was asking questions, it seemed the investigators didn’t ask enough. Danny’s brother, Jim has gone back and talked to all his brother’s close friends and even his wife. None of them had been interviewed by police. Why? What happened?

When the news was reported, ten different witnesses called into the police to report what they had seen. Every one of them said there were two men standing outside of Danny’s car that night. Who were these men? Why did he pull over in the first place? There wasn’t anything wrong with his car. Why weren’t these leads followed up? All these questions would haunt the King family.

This case sat dormant for over thirty years until Jim King finally caught the attention of the local authorities. St. Louis County Police officially reopened the case in November of 2016. Maybe now the family will find answers.

If you have any information on this case please call the St. Louis Regional Crime Stoppers at 1-866-371-TIPS (8477). Reference case #82-1179

The Blood Pact

ReganPoster

October 2014 – Iron River, Michigan
Chris Regan was finally breaking free from the little crime-ridden town of Iron River. Nestled amongst the vast forest lands and scenic lakes, it looked like a perfect place for an outdoors enthusiast like Regan. He worked at a local manufacturing company and there he met Kelly Cochran. After a while, the two would hook up at his apartment after work. Friends say he wasn’t “dating” Cochran and it was more about sex. They never ventured beyond Regan’s place. Small town gossip could be problematic, especially when Cochran was a married woman.

Chris Regan was an Air Force veteran with a weak knee. His job required him to stand all day and it was beginning to take a toll on his injury. In October, Chris landed a job in Ashville, North Carolina. He put in his two-week notice at work and was preparing to move. He was finally breaking out of this small town, but he wouldn’t escape. Regan had stepped into the grasp of a sadistic predator.

Just before leaving the state, Kelly Cochran invites Regan to meet at her house. He hadn’t been there before, so he had to jot down directions to find the place. Investigators would find this note in Regan’s abandoned vehicle a few days later. Before meeting up with Kelly, Regan made plans with a friend to have dinner on Saturday night. This friend would eventually be the one to file a missing person’s report when Chris Regan disappeared.

The rumor mill supplied investigators with the name of Chris Regan’s lover and investigators immediately visited the Cochran home. They note the strange behaviors of both Kelly Cochran and her husband Jason and proceed to request a search warrant for the home. Before this could be done, the Cochran couple left town leaving most of their possessions in the house. The house was a disastrous mess, but amazingly there weren’t many clues. If Chris Regan was murdered in that house, there wasn’t much left to go on.
While Iron River Investigators struggled to find the evidence needed to tie Kelly and Jason to the murder of Chris Regan, the Cochran couple were living in Hobart Indiana.

Two years would pass, and it looked like the case wouldn’t be solved, but then Iron River Investigators hear the news that would ultimately solve their own case. Kelly Cochran had been arrested in Indiana for killing her husband. That’s right. She murdered her husband by giving him an overdose of heroin and then suffocating him. She confessed to everything during a 70-hr interview with the Indiana police.

“I hated my husband because he took the best thing in my life,” Kelly told investigators. “It was revenge for Chris Regan.”

During the interview, the gruesome details of Chris Regan’s murder were discovered. Kelly had lured Chris to her house for sex and lasagna. After having sex with him, she walks him to the stairwell and positions him perfectly at the top. There Jason Cochran ambushed Regan shooting him in the back of the head with a long barreled .22 rifle. The couple pulled Regan’s lifeless body to the basement where everything had been covered in plastic. There they took an electric saw and mutilated the body and stuffed it into trash bags. They shoved Chris Regan into the trunk of his own car and drove him out to the woods and scattered his remains before leaving his car at a local Park & Ride.
If all of that weren’t bad enough, here is where the story takes a hideous turn. Years earlier Kelly and Jason had taken a blood oath. If either one of them had an affair, they were required to kill the lover. To make matters even worse, it would come out in a jailhouse phone call that Kelly may have killed 9 – 20 more men across four states over the years. These names haven’t been released to the public. If all of that wasn’t enough to make you sick to your stomach, one other tidbit would come out in Investigation Discovery’s new docu-series “Dead North.”
The Cochran couple hosted a neighborhood BBQ a few days after Chris Regan’s disappearance and some of the burgers didn’t come from a cow. For more information on this case check out the ID Channel’s docuseries “Dead North.”

When Rumors Destroy Cold Cases – The Jennifer Harris Story

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Small town America might be a great place to raise a family, but sometimes it isn’t the best place to die. Many rural communities lack the resources and experience to solve major homicide cases. When you add in the rumor mill of small-town gossip and the loss of major evidence, some people wonder if the case is solvable. Such is the case of Jennifer Harris from Bonham, Texas.
Jennifer Harris was a vivacious 28-yr-old with fiery red curly hair. Everyone around the community loved her including two men; Rob Holman and James Hamilton.
Holman was Jennifer’s childhood sweetheart. They were married shortly after high school and it looked like a happily ever after situation. Unfortunately, this wouldn’t be the case. The couple had a rocky relationship and some even claim Rob had abused Jennifer. It hasn’t been confirmed whether this was physical or verbal abuse and no police reports were ever filed.
As time passed and Jennifer went to college the couple began to grow apart. Rob enjoyed the laid-back pace of Bonham, Texas while Jennifer was enjoying living in the city. Things began to fall apart even further when Jennifer met James Hamilton in the massage therapy school she had been attending. The two hit it off and decided to open a business together. That wouldn’t be all they did together and soon Jennifer was living in the city and seeing James while Rob moved back to Bonham.
Hamilton was living with the mother of his two children and had a baby on the way but was insisting on marrying Jennifer. Jennifer refused and was quickly losing interest in Hamilton. By early 2002, Jennifer had lost her massage business with Hamilton and was facing bankruptcy. What does she do? She looks up Rob, who had a new girlfriend by this time. It didn’t seem to matter. The couple frequently met and slept together. All this soap opera style drama would lead up to Mother’s Day, 2002 and a mystery that has haunted Bonham, Texas for sixteen years.
Jennifer visits a friend during the early evening hours of May 12, 2002, and leaves around 8 pm. She wouldn’t be seen alive again. A woman takes her dog out for a walk down a lonely country road and notices a dark green jeep abandoned at the side of the road but thinks little of it until she sees it again the next day. She calls the police. The Jeep is quickly identified as belonging to Jennifer Harris. It would be a long six-day search before a fisherman would discover Jennifer’s lifeless body in the Red River.
The medical examiner determined the cause of death to be homicidal violence but couldn’t determine the exact cause of death. Her body had been severely decomposed, and her uterus was missing. This is where the rumor mill of small towns kicked into overdrive. As soon as that story was released theories ran wild. Friends of Jennifer Harris said she had confided in them about her pregnancy, but there wasn’t any hard evidence to verify it. Could she really have been pregnant, and the murderer removed her uterus to destroy evidence? This is what the townsfolk claimed. It would be years before her autopsy would be reexamined. After this examination, it is determined that Jennifer’s uterus was indeed missing, but so were other organs and body parts. The latter examiner determined that Jennifer had suffered some sort of severe injury that left her organs exposed to fish and turtles in the river.
Both Rob Holman and James Hamilton were initially interviewed by police and were named as possible suspects, but no arrests were made. Hamilton claimed he was at an Mc Donald’s over an hour away on the May 12th. After reviewing the case files new investigators and consultants are discouraged by the way this alibi was handled. It wasn’t verified properly, and no one ever pushed it. Rob Holman, on the other hand, claimed to be out driving around for over five hours on the night Jennifer disappeared. Hamilton supposedly passed a lie detector test, but Rob was never given one. To make matters worse, most of the evidence, in this case, has either been lost or damaged when the storage pods got wet. The clothing that was found was lost and so was her laptop. Nobody was even sure if the jeans and t-shirt were even Jennifer’s.
This case has more twists and turns than a roller coaster so hold on, there’s more. Jerry Harris took notes on the case from the beginning and was determined to find justice for his daughter. This meticulous record keeping brought up a sinister revelation years later. Two months after Jennifer’s body was found her ex-boyfriend, James Hamilton called the grieving father to ask about Jennifer’s life insurance policy. In all the case files, this is the only reference to an insurance policy. I have many questions about this. Was there actually an insurance policy taken out on the life of Jennifer Harris? If so, who was the beneficiary? Was there money paid out? Who received it? None of this has been reported. If the beneficiary was Rob or James then that would supply the investigators with a serious motive for murder. Who knows if this lead was even followed? The case file for Jennifer Harris is so slim no one knows what leads were followed and which ones weren’t.
A year later, a woman is watching the news when she hears about the Harris cold case. Incredibly, Deborah Lambert hadn’t heard about the case. She quickly called the police and gave a recorded statement. Deborah and her mother had driven across the Red River Bridge on Mother’s Day a year earlier and had witnessed a frightening scene around 5 pm. She vividly recalled a red-headed woman being rough-housed by three men. Deborah said she made eye contact with the woman and saw terror in her expression. Her mother said, “that girl is about to be raped and killed.” Deborah claimed she was too afraid to call the police at the time. Deborah claimed two men were wearing jeans and one man was wearing shorts. Because of the time discrepancy, the original investigators dismissed Deborah’s statement completely. The new team doesn’t dismiss it so quickly. In reality, the time difference can be explained. Most people don’t continuously watch the clock. Deborah and her mother could have traveled across the bridge later than she remembered, and or Jennifer’s friend could be mistaken on the time she left her home.
Jennifer’s younger sister Alyssa and her filmmaker husband Barry has taken up the case along with private investigator Daryl Parker and the new sheriff Mark Johnson. Everyone hopes to find justice for Jennifer. This case was recently highlighted on the show 48 Hours. Hopefully, the renewed interest in the case will generate some leads. If Deborah Lambert’s statement is correct, there could be two other men out there that know something about this case.
At one point, the local D.A. was accused of being involved in the murder of Jennifer Harris. This rumor was completely unfounded but based on the fabricated fact that her uterus was missing. Authorities researched this rumor extensively and found absolutely no connection, but the D.A. still lost his job over this case.

 

This case was so mishandled that people wonder if it can be solved at this point. I believe it can, but I have many questions. Here are a few of my questions and theories.
– Is it normal for a body to decompose so quickly in the river, or was she partially mutilated before her body was dumped?
– I would like to know what happened to Rob. Did his second marriage fall through? Is his wife/ex-wife still alive?
– Did a forensic team investigate Jennifer’s Jeep?
– Has anyone checked Jennifer’s online footprint? Yes her laptop is missing, but surely her accounts would still be there. Everyone had a MySpace account. If someone remembered Jennifer’s email address then they might be able to reopen the accounts and see who she was talking to at the time of her death.

My suspicion and theory:
Rob Holman claimed Jennifer had called him and wanted to see him on the evening of May 12th. He told the police that he refused to meet her because he had plans with his new girlfriend, but when asked for an alibi Rob said he didn’t have one. He was out driving around for four hours that night.
Ok. What is it then? Was he with his new girlfriend, or was he out driving around? Also, I looked up the historical weather data for that day. It was rainy, overcast, and pop up thunderstorms all evening. Who drives around in thunderstorms? Curious.

I have reached out to Sherriff Johnson and Daryl Parker with questions about this case. I haven’t heard back from them as of this writing, but I will update you all when I get some answers to my questions. As always, if you have any information regarding the murder of Jennifer Harris, please contact the Fannin County Sherriff’s office at (903) 583-2143

Missing 26 years – no answers

A small house on Delmar Street once witnessed the echoes of excitement, but now it remains a mystery that has haunted Springfield, Missouri for 26 years.

On the night of June 6, 1992, it held three women just beginning new chapters in their lives. Sherrill Levitt, 47 was a newly divorced cosmetologist who was looking forward to starting a new life. Susie Streeter,Levitt’s daughter was a 19-yr-old newly graduated senior. Staying with them for the night was Susie’s friend Stacy McCall,18. Saturday had been a whirlwind day. The two teenagers had attended all the graduation breakfasts, dinners, and events before attending the official ceremony. After graduation, the two attended several parties with various classmates and planned to meet up with a group the next day. Together they would travel south to Branson and spend the day at White Water and Silver Dollar City.

The last official sighting of Suzie and Stacy was around 2 am on June 7, 1992, when they left the house of Janelle Kirby. They promised to call Kirby when they woke the next morning, but the call never came. Back in the days before cell phones, Kirby and her boyfriend called the house but got the answering machine. They decided to drop in on the three women and see what happened. When they arrived they noticed all three women’s vehicles were parked in the driveway, so they assumed they were still there. Kirby knocks on the door but no one answers. The boyfriend notices the glass globe covering the porch light had been busted and lay shattered on the front porch. Without thinking he picks up a broom and cleans up the mess. Finding the door unlocked the two teenagers enter the house, but it is empty.

The beds look like they were slept in, nothing was missing, and the women’s personal belongings were all accounted for. Strangely, the women’s purses were all lined up in a neat little row, but Sherrill’s still contained $900 and her cigarettes. The front room television was on, but turned to a channel that was nothing but “snow.” The teens turned to leave thinking the women must have stepped out and would return shortly. Before they closed the door the telephone rang. Kirby picks up the phone only to find a man’s voice making sexual innuendos. Aggravated, she hangs up, but the phone rings yet again before she could get out the front door. It was the same caller. The two teens continue on to Branson thinking they will meet up with the girls down there. They would never see their friends again.

Several hours later, frustrated by her teenager’s lack of communication, Janis McCall drops by the little house on Delmar street looking for her daughter, Stacy. It would be Janis that calls the police to report the three women missing. Here is the most frustrating part of this case. The police don’t make it to the house until the next morning leaving the house unguarded for over 24 hours. It is estimated that at least ten friends and family members had trampled through the house before investigators arrived to secure the crime scene. Some friends even admitted to “picking up the place.” No one believed that three women secure in their home could just disappear. Surely they would return and this would all be cleared up soon. Unfortunately, that was not the case.

After the missing person’s investigation began to take shape in the local news, an elderly woman came forward with a tip. She always sat on her front porch in the mornings and noticed an older model van pull into her driveway in the early morning hours of June 7th. A young blond woman was driving and looked stressed. She heard a man’s voice speak to the young woman from the back seat in a harsh tone. He said something along the lines of, “back out slowly if you know what’s good for you.” When the investigators showed the witness a photo lineup, she picked out Susie Streeter as the driver. All of this took place only a couple blocks from the Delmar house. Police immediately follow the clues trying to find this light green van. The woman said it looked like a late 1960’s to an early 1970’s model. Tips began to pour in about the van sighting. Investigators said at one point the suspected van had been every color of the rainbow. How could they tell which tip was credible and which tip was not? It didn’t matter. The police doggedly followed every semi-credible lead in hopes of solving this unbelievable case. Up until this case, Springfield was viewed as a safe community. Nobody locked their doors. Children played in the streets and walked to school alone in the mornings. No one wanted to believe this could happen in their town. Now the entire city reeled at the news.

Without any physical clues at the crime scene, police began their investigation by digging into the backgrounds of the three women. Sherrill Levitt had just gone through a divorce and had recently purchased the home on Delmar Street. Could the ex-husband be a suspect? The police investigated him thoroughly and quickly ruled him out. Also, Levitt had an older son named Bart. He was nine years older than Susie and had a falling out with his mother recently. Bart also had a drinking problem. Could he be a suspect? Police quickly rule him out as well, but this wasn’t the end of the possible suspects connected to Susie Streeter. Streeter had recently broken up with a boy named Dustin Recla. Recla and his two friends, Michael Clay and Joseph Riedel had been in trouble with the law recently. Recla and his friends had been arrested for vandalizing a mausoleum at a local cemetery. They broke into the above ground grave, tore open several caskets, rummaged about the corpses and stole jewelry and gold teeth. It was said that they even stole a few skulls.

Now it takes a sick individual to desecrate a grave, disrespect a corpse, handle human remains, and tear out their teeth. It is said that Susie Streeter found out and was going to be a witness against them. Could these teenage boys be capable of kidnapping the three women? Possibly.

During a police interview, Michael Clay said he wished they were all dead. This was after they had been missing for quite awhile, so he couldn’t claim a lack of knowledge of this case. Despite this and the inability to verify the boy’s alibi, there isn’t any firm connection between the three missing women and the teenage boys. They remain suspects in this case to this day. Ok, so surely this is the end of this wild tale. Nope.

This investigation has dug up several monsters that were hiding in the Springfield area in 1992. I will give you a short list and will highlight their particular crimes at a later date.

Robert Craig Cox:
– Convicted kidnapper, murder suspect, living in the area at this time
– Worked at car dealership with Stacy McCall’s father
– Known to target teenage girls
– Made claims in a Texas prison that he knew what happened to the Springfield Three

Larry Dewayne Hall & Gary Hall:
– Twin brothers that traveled around the country doing Civil War Reenactments, known serial killers
– Larry claims his brother Gary was stalking one of the teens that night

Gerald Carnahan:
– Convicted killer of teenage girls
– Recently convicted of a 20-yr-old cold case through DNA evidence

Steven Eugene Garrison:
– Kidnapped, raped and tortured 20-yr-old college student in Springfield around the same time as this case
– Claimed his “friend” confessed to killing the missing women during a night of binge drinking

More conjecture:
While all of these men could be viable suspects, there isn’t enough evidence to convict any of them at this point and this case remains as cold as the Arctic Circle. Theories, rumors, and even psychic revelations have sensationalized this case to the point where it is hard to distinguish facts from folklore. Psychics claim they are buried under the parking lot of a nearby hospital. Some claim the girls witnessed a drug deal during their night of partying and they were killed as a result. Others claim they are buried in the Mark Twain National Forrest, or in Arkansas. I get letters from people with all sorts of theories. I reviewed one such letter today. I hope someday a viable lead will turn up in this case and give the victims’ family some answers. As a native of this area, I know this case affected me growing up. When I went to start looking at wedding dresses for my wedding, I went to the McCall’s Bridal shop. It had been five years after the disappearance, but the first thing I saw as we walked in was the yellow poster pictured above this post. It changed this entire area. It changed me. As always, if you have any information regarding this case please contact the Springfield Police Department at (417) 864-1810.

Almost Rescued – The Angela Hammond Disappearance

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The disappearance of Angela Hammond, 20 has tormented Rob Shafer for nearly three decades. In April 1991 Shafer was a high school senior engaged to the beautiful Angie Hammond. She was four months pregnant and they were both looking forward to their life together. Both the Shafer’s and the Hammond’s families were eagerly awaiting the marriage and the birth of the new grandbaby. Life was going to be great.
Reality struck hard, however, on the night of April 4, 1991. Angie and Rob spent the evening at a BBQ before Rob had to return home to babysit his younger brother. The couple planned on meeting up again later. Angie promised she would call in an hour and left Rob on his doorstep. Back in the day before cell phones, Angie would call her fiancé from a local payphone. Today with all the crime shows on TV, no woman in her right mind would be alone at 11 pm talking on a payphone, but things were different in the rural town of Clinton, Missouri.
The entire community population was less than 8,000 people. Most were farmers, factory workers, or owned a small local business. Teenagers would cruise around the town square for fun and hang out in the parking lots of the local grocery store. The police station was only two blocks away and violent crime was unheard of. This naïve environment would be shattered before Angie and Rob’s phone call was completed.
Standing in the grocery store parking lot, the 20-yr-old Angie was chatting with her fiancé. She mentioned to Rob that a strange truck kept circling around the square. It was a late 60’s early 70’s model Ford F-150. Being a native of Clinton, she knew most of the vehicles that usually cruised the square. Neither caller thought much about it and their conversation continued. Angie stated that she was getting tired and decided to go on home instead of waiting around for Rob. Moments later Angie described the strange man that emerged from the two-toned truck. She said he was a dirty looking old white guy with a white beard and mustache. He had used the phone next to her and then returned to his truck, but he didn’t leave. This made Angie nervous. Suddenly the man returned, and Rob hears Angie scream. Dropping the phone in a panic, Rob runs out to his car and barrels down the road the seven blocks to the payphone. As he approaches the scene the old Ford pickup passes him on the road. Angie screams “Robbie” and Rob shoves his car into reverse and spins around in the road to give chase.
The hero saves the girl, beats down the bad guy, the police come and arrest the kidnapper, and everyone lives happily ever after, right? No. Reality is grim, and those sudden spins you see cars do in the movies are not real. When poor Robbie slammed his car into reverse and spun, it also destroyed the car’s transmission. The older model car gave chase for about two miles but died in the middle of the street. Robert Shafer was left to watch the truck disappear down the dark rural lane. Helpless and alone he made his way back to the police station to report what happened.
It is here that Rob discovered the sad truth about an inexperienced police department. With the low crime rate, the police had little experience dealing with violent crime. This would stall the process, but the case went forward. Of course, Rob was the first suspect, but after a week-long investigation, he was cleared. They ran checks on all the trucks in the area that might fit the description, but that too came to no conclusion. Rob was able to add to the truck’s description the fact that it had a window decal covering the back glass. The decal was of a fish jumping out of the water. Still, with this added info the truck seemed to vanish into the night.
Rob gave details to the police sketch artist about the truck’s driver. This is where details seem to differ from Angie’s description over the phone. This discrepancy caused some people to look narrowly at Rob, but investigators came to a different conclusion. Below is pictured the composite sketch of the driver as remembered by Rob.

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You can clearly see that this man does not have a white beard and mustache. I would argue that the facial hair was fake. I will give you my theories later.
Almost immediately after Rob Shafer was ruled out as a suspect, the officials began to try to link this disappearance with two other missing women from Missouri. One woman was Trudy Darby from Macks Creek, Missouri. Darby worked at a local convenience store. On January 19, 1991, she had been robbed, kidnapped, and murdered. Her body was discovered two days later.
The second woman was Cheryl Ann Kenney. Like Darby, Kenney was robbed, kidnapped, and presumed murdered, but her body hasn’t been found as of this writing. Kenney was kidnapped from Nevada, Missouri.
Now it’s time for a geography lesson. It is 69 miles from Clinton, MO to Macks Creek, and 74 miles from Clinton to Nevada, MO. If you were to plot out a giant triangle on a Missouri roadmap the final side would be 83 miles from Macks Creek to Clinton. Although these aren’t great distances to travel, the way in which these crimes took place it makes me think they are not connected.

Two years later the case of Trudy Darby was solved. Two brothers, Jesse Rush and Marvin Chaney confessed to robbing, raping, and murdering Darby. After intense investigations, they never found any links between Angie Hammond and the brothers.

So who could have taken Angie Hammond from the phone booth that night in Clinton, Missouri? Some wondered if a serial killer was on the loose in rural Missouri. Although these cases weren’t necessarily related there was indeed a serial killer hiding out only 70 miles up the interstate. This brutal slayer of women was wanted by Texas authorities and was flying under the radar by using the alias of Richard Fowler. His name was Kenneth McDuff. This serial killer was featured on America’s Most Wanted in April 1992. He was recognized by a coworker and arrested on May 4, 1992. Some say that McDuff was responsible for many more victims than he was given credit for. Others wonder if those reports are inflated. Below is a mugshot of McDuff.
Could this be the man behind the disappearance of Angela Hammond? There’s a good possibility. He was in the area. He had a habit of picking random women and brutally killing them. And if you look at the specific details of the composite sketch you will find eerie similarities.

angela_marie_hammond_10mcduff003a

Ok now, look at the individual characteristics of the face. Look at the bridge of the nose. Notice the small indention? It is visible in both photos. Notice the marking under the left eye and the dark brows. What do you think? Could this be the man behind Hammond’s disappearance? Could he have worn a fake beard and during the struggle to get Angela into his truck it came off somehow?

I would like to see investigators check out his alias, Richard Fowler to see if he owned a pickup like the one witnesses seen in Clinton, MO. We may never know for sure. McDuff was executed for his heinous crimes on November 17, 1998. If Hammond’s body could be found and DNA extracted then there might be a chance of tying it back to him, but after nearly three decades finding the DNA of a killer on the bones of a victim might be impossible.

As with every case I highlight, if you have any information on the disappearance of Angela Hammond please contact the Clinton Police Department at (600) 885-2679.