Missing 26 years – no answers

A small house on Delmar Street once witnessed the echoes of excitement, but now it remains a mystery that has haunted Springfield, Missouri for 26 years.

On the night of June 6, 1992, it held three women just beginning new chapters in their lives. Sherrill Levitt, 47 was a newly divorced cosmetologist who was looking forward to starting a new life. Susie Streeter,Levitt’s daughter was a 19-yr-old newly graduated senior. Staying with them for the night was Susie’s friend Stacy McCall,18. Saturday had been a whirlwind day. The two teenagers had attended all the graduation breakfasts, dinners, and events before attending the official ceremony. After graduation, the two attended several parties with various classmates and planned to meet up with a group the next day. Together they would travel south to Branson and spend the day at White Water and Silver Dollar City.

The last official sighting of Suzie and Stacy was around 2 am on June 7, 1992, when they left the house of Janelle Kirby. They promised to call Kirby when they woke the next morning, but the call never came. Back in the days before cell phones, Kirby and her boyfriend called the house but got the answering machine. They decided to drop in on the three women and see what happened. When they arrived they noticed all three women’s vehicles were parked in the driveway, so they assumed they were still there. Kirby knocks on the door but no one answers. The boyfriend notices the glass globe covering the porch light had been busted and lay shattered on the front porch. Without thinking he picks up a broom and cleans up the mess. Finding the door unlocked the two teenagers enter the house, but it is empty.

The beds look like they were slept in, nothing was missing, and the women’s personal belongings were all accounted for. Strangely, the women’s purses were all lined up in a neat little row, but Sherrill’s still contained $900 and her cigarettes. The front room television was on, but turned to a channel that was nothing but “snow.” The teens turned to leave thinking the women must have stepped out and would return shortly. Before they closed the door the telephone rang. Kirby picks up the phone only to find a man’s voice making sexual innuendos. Aggravated, she hangs up, but the phone rings yet again before she could get out the front door. It was the same caller. The two teens continue on to Branson thinking they will meet up with the girls down there. They would never see their friends again.

Several hours later, frustrated by her teenager’s lack of communication, Janis McCall drops by the little house on Delmar street looking for her daughter, Stacy. It would be Janis that calls the police to report the three women missing. Here is the most frustrating part of this case. The police don’t make it to the house until the next morning leaving the house unguarded for over 24 hours. It is estimated that at least ten friends and family members had trampled through the house before investigators arrived to secure the crime scene. Some friends even admitted to “picking up the place.” No one believed that three women secure in their home could just disappear. Surely they would return and this would all be cleared up soon. Unfortunately, that was not the case.

After the missing person’s investigation began to take shape in the local news, an elderly woman came forward with a tip. She always sat on her front porch in the mornings and noticed an older model van pull into her driveway in the early morning hours of June 7th. A young blond woman was driving and looked stressed. She heard a man’s voice speak to the young woman from the back seat in a harsh tone. He said something along the lines of, “back out slowly if you know what’s good for you.” When the investigators showed the witness a photo lineup, she picked out Susie Streeter as the driver. All of this took place only a couple blocks from the Delmar house. Police immediately follow the clues trying to find this light green van. The woman said it looked like a late 1960’s to an early 1970’s model. Tips began to pour in about the van sighting. Investigators said at one point the suspected van had been every color of the rainbow. How could they tell which tip was credible and which tip was not? It didn’t matter. The police doggedly followed every semi-credible lead in hopes of solving this unbelievable case. Up until this case, Springfield was viewed as a safe community. Nobody locked their doors. Children played in the streets and walked to school alone in the mornings. No one wanted to believe this could happen in their town. Now the entire city reeled at the news.

Without any physical clues at the crime scene, police began their investigation by digging into the backgrounds of the three women. Sherrill Levitt had just gone through a divorce and had recently purchased the home on Delmar Street. Could the ex-husband be a suspect? The police investigated him thoroughly and quickly ruled him out. Also, Levitt had an older son named Bart. He was nine years older than Susie and had a falling out with his mother recently. Bart also had a drinking problem. Could he be a suspect? Police quickly rule him out as well, but this wasn’t the end of the possible suspects connected to Susie Streeter. Streeter had recently broken up with a boy named Dustin Recla. Recla and his two friends, Michael Clay and Joseph Riedel had been in trouble with the law recently. Recla and his friends had been arrested for vandalizing a mausoleum at a local cemetery. They broke into the above ground grave, tore open several caskets, rummaged about the corpses and stole jewelry and gold teeth. It was said that they even stole a few skulls.

Now it takes a sick individual to desecrate a grave, disrespect a corpse, handle human remains, and tear out their teeth. It is said that Susie Streeter found out and was going to be a witness against them. Could these teenage boys be capable of kidnapping the three women? Possibly.

During a police interview, Michael Clay said he wished they were all dead. This was after they had been missing for quite awhile, so he couldn’t claim a lack of knowledge of this case. Despite this and the inability to verify the boy’s alibi, there isn’t any firm connection between the three missing women and the teenage boys. They remain suspects in this case to this day. Ok, so surely this is the end of this wild tale. Nope.

This investigation has dug up several monsters that were hiding in the Springfield area in 1992. I will give you a short list and will highlight their particular crimes at a later date.

Robert Craig Cox:
– Convicted kidnapper, murder suspect, living in the area at this time
– Worked at car dealership with Stacy McCall’s father
– Known to target teenage girls
– Made claims in a Texas prison that he knew what happened to the Springfield Three

Larry Dewayne Hall & Gary Hall:
– Twin brothers that traveled around the country doing Civil War Reenactments, known serial killers
– Larry claims his brother Gary was stalking one of the teens that night

Gerald Carnahan:
– Convicted killer of teenage girls
– Recently convicted of a 20-yr-old cold case through DNA evidence

Steven Eugene Garrison:
– Kidnapped, raped and tortured 20-yr-old college student in Springfield around the same time as this case
– Claimed his “friend” confessed to killing the missing women during a night of binge drinking

More conjecture:
While all of these men could be viable suspects, there isn’t enough evidence to convict any of them at this point and this case remains as cold as the Arctic Circle. Theories, rumors, and even psychic revelations have sensationalized this case to the point where it is hard to distinguish facts from folklore. Psychics claim they are buried under the parking lot of a nearby hospital. Some claim the girls witnessed a drug deal during their night of partying and they were killed as a result. Others claim they are buried in the Mark Twain National Forrest, or in Arkansas. I get letters from people with all sorts of theories. I reviewed one such letter today. I hope someday a viable lead will turn up in this case and give the victims’ family some answers. As a native of this area, I know this case affected me growing up. When I went to start looking at wedding dresses for my wedding, I went to the McCall’s Bridal shop. It had been five years after the disappearance, but the first thing I saw as we walked in was the yellow poster pictured above this post. It changed this entire area. It changed me. As always, if you have any information regarding this case please contact the Springfield Police Department at (417) 864-1810.

Published by

synovacantrell

Synova Cantrell is Southwest Missouri’s #1 True Crime Writer/Blogger. She is the author of Unorganized Crime; a biography of the ex-gangster Sidney Heard of Chicago, IL. This thrilling tale of con games, bank robbery, and mayhem has recently been endorsed by a retired FBI agent. Her best-selling series, Seriously Stupid Criminals is a fan favorite in both paperback and e-book formats. Her latest e-book, Grim Justice tells the story of a judge and his wife murdered in Palm Beach, Florida in 1955. Fan eagerly await her newest serial killer series set to launch late 2018. To follow all her adventures and read her true crime blog, log onto www.synovaink.com Connect with Synova: Twitter: https://twitter.com/synovaink Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/synovacantrell

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s